How to adjust a pattern written for the magic loop method for dpns and vice versa

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A pattern written for the magic loop method

Unless otherwise stated in the pattern, patterns written for the magic loop method simply assume that your stitches are divided evenly onto two needles. The problem in this case is that you would like to have your stitches divided evenly onto four double pointed needles (dpns). Usually toe-up sock patterns are written for the magic loop method because knitting socks toe-up with dpns might be a bit tricky. If you don’t like to magic looping but want to knit your socks toe-up you might want to try flexi flip needles.

For instance if you are knitting a sock with a total of 60 sts, the magic loop pattern assumes that you have 30 sts on needle 1 and 30 sts on needle 2. However, in reality you have 15 sts on each of the dpns. This means that if the pattern tells you to work to the end of needle 1 you need to work the first and the second dpn on your work.

Lets take an example, a sock pattern written for the magic loop method might say for instance:

Decrease round:
needle 1: k1, ssk, k to 3 sts from end, k2tog, k1
needle 2: Work the same way as needle 1.

This means that if you want your stitches divided evenly onto four dpns you need to work the previous pattern as follows:

Decrease round:
k1, ssk, k to end of the first dpn, k to 3 sts from the end of the second dpn, k2tog, k1.
Work the third dpn the same way as the first one and the fourth dpn the same as the second one.
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A pattern written for the double pointed needles

Unless otherwise stated in the pattern, patterns written for the double pointed needles (dpns) simply assume that your stitches are divided evenly onto four needles. The problem in this case is that you would like to have your stitches divided evenly onto two needles.

For instance if you are knitting a sock with a total of 60 sts, the pattern assumes that you have 15 sts on each needle but in reality you would like to have 30 sts on needle 1 and 30 sts on needle 2. This means that if the pattern tells you to work to the end of the first dpn you need to work half of the stitches on needle 1.

The simple solution here is to place a marker in the middle of both of your needles and everytime the pattern tells you to work to the end of the first or the third dpn you work to the first or the second marker. If the pattern tells you to work to the end of the second or the fourth dpn you work to the end of needle 1 or needle 2.

A pattern written for the dpns might say for instance:

k2tog at the beginning of each needle

This means that if you want your stitches divided evenly onto four dpns you need to work the previous pattern as follows:

needle 1: k2tog, k to marker, slip marker, k2tog, k to end of needle 1
needle 2: k2tog, k to marker, slip marker, k2tog, k to end of needle 2

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1 Response

  1. Jilly says:

    Thank you so much you have answered the question for me. I now know what to do and will make life much easier.
    You are a STAR

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